Yellow Bittern - female



Little Yellow Bittern

Yellow Bittern is one of the secretive bird we know. We saw it many times but did not succeed to take its clear photographs. We are planning to visit the Kutch or Jamnagar for breeding plumage of waders from long time.  Finally, Anand and I decided to try our luck at Nal Sarovar. I reached Nal Sarovar at 6 am while my friends Dr Anand Patel, Viren Desai and Hiren Joshi (all came for breeding plumage) were little late and came around 7 am to lake. With formal introduction with each other, we started our search for breeding plumage. All the birds in lake look like they all are in breeding plumage...! Their plumage is different from usual. When we enter into the lake, we saw the Pheasant-tailed Jacana and then we saw this beauty. It is in its full breeding plumage and foraging in shallow water. In afternoon, we went for Red-necked Falcon story of it on following link. “http://www.escapeintothewild.net/2016/08/red-necked-falcon.html“. In evening, we started our journey back to Nal Sarovar for Ballion’s Crank. Usually this Crank appears in late evening. We are searching for the Crank and all of sudden we saw the Yellow Bittern in edge of the reed. It appears and disappears so fast, so we can able to click just few shot.  
The yellow bittern (Ixobrychus sinensis) is a small bittern. It is of Old World origins, breeding in much of the Indian Subcontinent. This is a small species at 36 to 38 cm (14 to 15 in) in length, with a short neck and longish bill. The male is uniformly dull yellow above and buff below. The head and neck are chestnut, with a black crown. The female's crown, neck and breast are streaked brown, and the juvenile is like the female but heavily streaked brown below, and mottled with buff above. Yellow bitterns feed on insects, fish and amphibians.

14th  April 2016
Nal Sarovar Bird Sanctuary, near Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

Nikon D7100
AF-S Nikkor 300mm F/4D IF-ED + AF-S Teleconverter TC-14E
f/14, 1/250,iso-800

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